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doc/bird.sgml
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	<tag>neighbor <m/ip/ as <m/number/</tag> Define neighboring router
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	this instance will be talking to and what AS it's located in. Unless
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	you use the <cf/multihop/ clause, it must be directly connected to one
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	of your router's interfaces. This parameter is mandatory.
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	of your router's interfaces. In case the neighbor is in the same AS
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	as we are, we automatically switch to iBGP. This parameter is mandatory.
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	<tag>multihop <m/number/ via <m/ip/</tag> Configure multihop BGP to a
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	neighbor which is connected at most <m/number/ hops far and to which
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	we should route via our direct neighbor with address <m/ip/.
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	selection among multiple BGP routes (see the selection rules above). It's
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	used as an additional metric which is propagated through the whole local AS.
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	<tag>int <cf/bgp_med/ [IO]</tag> The Multiple Exit Discriminator of the route
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	which is an optional attribute which is often used within the local AS to
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	is an optional attribute which is often used within the local AS to
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	reflect interior distances to various boundary routers. See the route selection
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	rules above for exact semantics.
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	<tag>enum <cf/bgp_origin/</tag> Origin of the route: either <cf/ORIGIN_IGP/,
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tables with OS kernel. Basically, it sends all routing table updates to the kernel
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and from time to time it scans the kernel tables to see whether some routes have
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disappeared (for example due to unnoticed up/down transition of an interface)
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or whether an `alien' route has been added by someone else.
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or whether an `alien' route has been added by someone else (depending on the
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<cf/learn/ switch, such routes are either deleted or we accept them to our
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table).
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<p>If your OS supports only a single routing table, you can configure only one
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instance of the Kernel protocol. If it supports multiple tables (in order to
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<sect1>Static
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<p>The Static protocol doesn't communicate with other routers in the network,
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but instead it allows you to define routes manually which is often used for
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but instead it allows you to define routes manually. This is often used for
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specifying how to forward packets to parts of the network which don't use
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dynamic routing at all and also for defining sink routes (i.e., those
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telling to return packets as undeliverable if they are in your IP block,

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